WayCup

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WayCup and smell the difference!

The Challenge

There are many coffee shop chains that have a commitment to sustainability. Some have fairtrade coffee, some have reusable cups, some give leftover sandwiches to the homeless, and some have vintage furniture rather than new. 

All this is good. But what would be VERY good would be a coffee chain committed to doing ALL of these things - and more. That would be a place where you could truly enjoy your meal. If it were also profitable, because it had managed to pinpoint something that there is a real demand for, it would be close-on the perfect business. And that is exactly the café chain that we have set out to create with WayCup. 

You might say that the most sustainable of all would be not to visit cafés at all. This is true. But we feel that it is more interesting to explore the idea of balance - between your enjoyment of the odd coffeehouse visit, and your commitment to being a good citizen.

So, if you ARE going to indulge in a coffee occasionally, what is the best way to do it? Or, in other words: let’s create the best café possible. Literally! 

 

The Solution

“WayCup represents a new paradigm that we believe will soon be the new normal,” says Stylt Trampoli founder and creative director Erik Nissen Johansen. “People don’t want compromises, they want the real thing. And WayCup is the real thing, and the first café of its kind. We’re very proud of our role in creating and realising this concept.”

The interior of a WayCup café is entirely put together from up-cycled materials, from the tiles on the walls to the plates and glasses. Lamps are made from old pipes, the tables are cut from doors, the counter is lined with sheets of recycled galvanised steel, and the walls are covered with colourful, striped rag rugs.  

Soup is served in old jars, the speakers are housed in vintage guitar cases, and  groceries are stored on shelves made from beautifully rusted scaffolding. The seat cushions at Kyrkogatan are sewn from worn-out jeans, donated by our customers, while at Järntorget, the walls are covered in a mosaic of old vinyl records. And everything, from planks and grout to vintage lampshades, is sourced within a few miles of Gothenburg.  

But of course, a café is not about cushions, it's really all about the food and drink. It goes without saying that the coffee is organic and fairly traded, and the menus have been created by chef Paul Svensson, a long-time enthusiastic advocate of locavorism and sustainable farming. Very nearly all the ingredients, from produce and bread to meat and cheese, are locally sourced and sustainably produced. 

Waste is kept to a minimum with smart recipes that get the most out of everything - for example the “bread with three lives” is first used for sandwiches, then for soups and salads, and anything left over is made into tasty crisps and snacks. Naturally, all organic waste is composted and every last scrap of remotely recyclable material is recycled. Even napkins, straws and takeaway cups are all made from recycled materials.

The Result

The launch of WayCup was greeted with interest, not just in Gothenburg but nationally. Clearly, the concept of a café that is good in more than one way is an idea whose time has come.

WayCup currently has two locations in Gothenburg, but the goal, right from the start, has been to grow into a chain. As a chain, WayCup will have the presence to truly set a new standard for the café world, and even, in time, for the whole hospitality industry.

WayCup knows that you care about good food and drink, and also that you care about the planet. It is about a radical commitment to your enjoyment - because coffee tastes better without a side of environmental guilt. And that, right there, is a truly great business idea. 

 

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